EPT Barcelona before day 2
    B
Date: Aug 24, 2016
Added By: Andreas Hø...
Last Date: Oct 25, 2016
Category:  EPT
Original Date: Aug 24, 2016

Barcelona, August 24th 2016

I had a pretty interesting day at the office on day 1 of the EPT here in Barcelona. I haven’t been here in a very long time and I felt very ready to play some good poker.

 

I started at a table that looked okay from the start. I had a Russian to my right that was very friendly both when it came to table talk and donating chips.  His name was Andrey Andreev. Unfortunately I wasn’t one of the takers except in a few small pots. But that was okay since the biggest gainer from him 3-bet me when I had opened with pocket nines. The flop came 9-3-3 with two hearts. Not horrible. Here I could slow play, but since there is two hearts on the table and my opponent looked pretty strong after the flop I went for a check raise. The turn was a black queen. I bet and got called again. The river was a 4 that wasn’t a heart. I went for a “bluff bet” and put in almost full pot bet. The villain called immediately and I showed him the bad news. I had 40k in my stack (from 30k) and we had just started. Yummy!

 

I kept on hitting well. But on level 1 and 2 when the pots are small it doesn’t matter very much. I was able to build my stack and had a good time at the table.

 

Byron Kaverman and Dominik Nitsche filled two empty seats at my table, both ranked top 10 in the Global Poker Index (GPI).  Not good news, of course.

  

Against Dominik I played one pot that I don’t know if was good or bad to be honest. He opened from the button in my small blind and I had A-4 off suit. Not a good hand, but better that his opening range. I decided to 3 bet to make him fold some of his range. That didn’t happen and he called (later I realized that he didn’t fold many 3-bets when he was in position, so I would maybe have played the hand differently today). The flop came Q-9-8 with two hearts. I c-bet and Dominik called. Time to give up? Probably. But the turn was a 10, a pretty good bluff card for me. I checked and Dominik bet 3k. Now I had to “protect my hand” and I raised to 8k and Dominik called super fast. Ouch.  I didn’t think he had a jack and put him on a heart draw, maybe with a pair included. The river was a low blank. I was telling a story on the turn and giving up now would be a bad idea. I put him all-in and he mucked pretty fast. Phew. I showed my hand since it was the last bluff I would do like this at this table. I’m not sure if that was the right thing to do.

 

I had a period where I played quite a few hands, but nothing very special. I was moved to a new table after a while and at that point I had about 48k in my stack.

 

At my new table I got no cards for a very long time. The players seemed to be on a lower level than my last one, but I didn’t feel like playing my total junk hands. I also like to play quite tight when I come to a new table to observe. Before I really got started Jason Koon filled an empty seat. He is one of the nicest guys in poker and if he wasn’t such a good player I would always love to have him at my table. At the table he can be a beast. If the other players let him, he will crush souls. We played together at Bellagio in 2010 in a WPT for the first time. I remember that I thought he was the most fun and also one of the best players I played against that time. And he had just started his live poker carrier. Since then he has had a ton of results, latest in Florida when he won a million dollars after beating almost 900 players.

 

I had decided that I wouldn’t play many big pots against him even being in position (he was two to my right). At this point he had about 45k and I almost 60k. Then a hand came where he opened and I had a hand I could play, so I called. The flop came K-9-4 rainbow and Jason c-bet. I raised and Jason called. The turn was an ace that was of the suit that wasn’t there from before. And now we got into a click-raise war. Jason put almost half his stack in and my last raise was 9k on top in a more than 40k pot. Jason had 21k behind and looked very confused. He used quite some time and ended up open folding A-9 of spades. A very strong fold that I don’t think many players could do. I asked if he wanted to see my hand and he said, “Please don’t show me a bluff”, so I mucked.

 

After the hand the guessing game started. Pretty much all the players at the table were guessing, Jason probably more than the others. I asked him if he had ever bluffed hard and immediately regretted it after.  He said yes, that had happened, and looked, if possible, even more confused. I felt a bit bad for torturing him this way, but I was, to be honest, a bit disappointed that he didn’t call. I had pocket nines and Jason owned me in the pot with that fold.  I put him on 44 or AK and was expecting him to go all-in. He said he would push the river for value and I believe him. WP, Jason! Not so WP, Andreas (you greedy and impatient sucker)!

 

After this I had a pretty good session and ended the day with 120,100 in chips. Jason ended with 66k after having been down to 11k. I hope to see him at the final table for more fun hands!

 

I was super happy to see that Peter Kvisthammar, a very good Swedish friend playing his first EPT main, ended up on an average stack to day 2. He came from a 3rd place in the senior’s event here and decided to play with the big guys (no jokes added here). Go, brother, go!

 

 

This is my starting table today:

 

1

Dzmitry Urbanovich

Poland

16 300

2

Roar Wang

Norway

62 900

3

Andreas Hoivold

Norway

120 100

4

Natan Chauskin

Belarus

47 600

5

Dmitry Gromov

Russia

83 700

6

Carter Swidler

Italy

104 000

7

Theo Jorgensen

Denmark

59 400

8

Oskar Szwed

Poland

44 000

9

Michael Gathy

Belgium

48 000

 

 

Urbanovich in seat 1 is a beast. He was the one that first had a crazy 200 to 1 bet against Vanessa Selbst about winning 3 bracelets. He was never close, but putting up $ 10,000 in a bet like that says a lot about his self-confidence. He plays all games and plays them well. The good news are his stack and his position.

 

Theo Jørgensen in seat 7 used to be the Danish player that I least wanted on my table. He was super solid and very good at putting pressure on other players. I expect him to be the same way still, even though I haven’t played with him for several years.

 

The rest of the players I don’t know or haven’t played with. I’m happy to not have any super stacks at my table and I’m very much ready to start playing! Let’s do this!

 

 Thanks a lot to Videoslots.com that makes this possible :)

 


 

 

 


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